Spritzer Start-up / Shut-down & QC Procedures

Spritzer Start-up / Shut-down & QC Procedures

Video Transcription

At Foam Supplies, safety is always our primary concern, especially personal safety. That’s why we created this instructional video on the proper and safe startup, shutdown, and QC procedures of our spritzer dispensing unit. After viewing the procedures, if there is anything you don’t understand please contact our technical service department before attempting anything. A representative will be happy to walk you through procedures, or schedule a visit for training. Before we begin, let’s take a quick look at the various letter and color designations of the isocyanate. Commonly referred to as MDI, or iso for short, and polyol cylinders in different parts of the world. In this video, we’ll also use the US designations of A for iso and B for polyol. Okay, let’s get started. First, always remember to wear protective eyewear and gloves while operating the gun.

Please refer to the SDS for the proper and safe handling of materials, including the use of protective equipment like safety glasses, protective gloves, and respirator protection where needed. A separate video is available on proper respirator use. With your protective gear in place, you’re ready to begin the startup procedures. The first step is to check the chemical cylinders to ensure sufficient chemical supply. For large vessels, check the level gauge on both the ISO or A and polyol or B cylinders. If the chemical level is five percent or below, cylinders must be changed before proceeding. Draining tanks below five percent will lead to nitrogen in the chemical lines. For smaller vessel types, we recommend investing in scales to get accurate readings and to allow for maximum utilization of the chemical in the tanks. If you do not have scales, the next best method is to carefully push the vessel, as if you were going to tip it over. If the vessel is not easy to tip, sufficient chemicals exist. If the vessel tips easily, it is recommended that you change it out.

When the chemical level draws lower than the chemical dip tube, nitrogen is pushed into the chemical lines. Nitrogen in the lines will cause problems with dispensing equipment, and can also result in bad foam, and therefore poor in product. If you need to change chemical cylinders, follow these procedures. First, double check that the nitrogen cylinder is secure. After disconnecting the old cylinders, remove the cap from the new is or A cylinder, and clean out the old. Attach the hose, or strap and tighten with a wrench. There is no grease on the polyol, or B cylinder, so just remove the cap. Lubricate the threads and attach the hose. Now check the temperature gauges on both filter assemblies. Proper operating temperature is important for all polyurethane applications, but is especially critical for spritzer applications. 85 degrees Fahrenheit or 29 degrees Celsius is the minimum operating temperature. Conditioning tanks to the minimum temperature must occur prior to all other procedures. Please refer to the process setup acknowledgement for the specific operating parameters for your foaming process.

Next, confirm there is sufficient nitrogen supply. This is a good time to review the ways nitrogen is supplied. Single bottles, six packs, 12 packs, micro bulk tanks, and bulk tanks. Only approved nitrogen regulators that are equipped with a pressure relief valve can be used to assure safe operation. Check with your FSI representative if you have any questions. To check the supply, open the nitrogen cylinder valve slowly, but ensure that it is fully open. Now, connect the nitrogen hoses to the ISO and polyol cylinders. Slowly open the nitrogen ball valves at both cylinders to pressurize. After the cylinders are pressurized, slowly open the chemical ball valves at the cylinders. Now, check the following three parameters. First, check for leaks. Leaks will lead to an unnecessary waste of nitrogen and cause more frequent change outs. Second, check the nitrogen reserve gauge.

Sufficient nitrogen capacity is necessary for production. The minimum nitrogen requirement is 250 psi. Change nitrogen tanks when the gauge shows reading below 250 psi. Third, check the nitrogen pressures. Keep in mind these pressures are set during initial setup, and adjustments rarely if ever need to be made. For most applications, the ISO pressure should be 30 to 50 psi lower than the polyol pressure. For example, an ISO pressure of 150 psi and a polyol pressure of 180 psi is ideal. However, for marine applications the pressure difference should be reversed, with ISO pressure of about 180, and polyol pressure of about 150. Again, pressures are preset and rarely need to be changed.

Next, clean the gun head face and attach the ratio nozzle. Then, open the iso and polyol ball valves at the gun whip. At this point, it is important to remember that the gun is ready to fire and precautions should always be taken to avoid an accidental discharge. Before production, it is important to perform two quality control procedures, ratio, and throughput. First, check the chemical ratio. Having the proper ratio is critical to dispensing good foam. Ratio is the weight comparison for the is or A output to the polyol or B output. As an example if the ISO weight is 124 grams, and the polyol weight is 91 grams the ratio is 100 to 73. Which is ideal for a system with a polyol target ratio range
of 100 to 70 to 75, which is typical for flotation foam. If the ratio dropped below 100 to 70, the info would be Iso rich. If the ratio rose to over 100 to 75, the foam would be polyol rich. If the ratio is not correct, poor foam qualities will result. Iso rich foam can be crunchy, have glassy cells, and result in less yield. Polyol rich foam can be soft and spongy, can shrink and can also result in less yield. Ratios are system specific and provided upon initial setup. If you’re not sure of the proper ratio for your system please contact FSI technical service for assistance.

To check the ratio, make sure the ratio nozzle is attached and taped two separate plastic bags together, and slide them over the independent ends of the nozzle, so that only Iso chemical dispenses into one bag, and only polyol into the other. Once you have a firm grip on the bags, disengage the trigger safety, and pull the trigger to dispense a timed 6 second shot. Then seal both bags. You are now ready to weigh the chemical and calculate the ratio. Remember, you only want to record the weight of the chemical itself, not the box or plastic bag. So you will need to tear or zero out the scale with an empty plastic bag.

Remove the empty bag and place the bag of ISO chemical on the scale and record the weight in the daily log. Remove the ISO bag and replace it with the polyol chemical bag and record the weight. Now, divide the polyol by the ISO to calculate the ratio. In this example of a phone system used for insulation, the iso weighed 118 grams and the polyol weighed 107 grams. Using the ratio formula, Divide 107 by 118 then multiply by 100 which results in a ratio of 10 to 90.6. Record this value in the B ratio column of the daily log. In this example, the ratio is within the target range of 100 to 88 to 92. If the ratio is in the desired range, you can move on to the throughput procedure, but if the ratio is not in the desired range, call the FSI technical service department, adjustments may be necessary. It is important to properly dispose of the two bags of chemical used for calculating the ratio.

Simply dump the contents of one bag into the other and mix the two chemicals thoroughly. This foam can now be allowed to cure, and then be safely discarded. Do not place the foam in a dumpster or trash can until the bag has had 24 hours to cool down. Now you are ready to check throughput. We define throughput as the weight of the foam dispensed from the unit per min. Commonly referred to as pounds per minute, or ppm. Attach the production or mixed nozzle. For this demonstration, we are using a standard mixed nozzle, the nozzle used for marine applications is slightly longer. Dispense a timed 6 second shot into a plastic bag. While the foam is setting up, detach the production nozzle and wipe off the gun face thoroughly. Then, weigh the bag and record the weight in the daily law. In this example, the foam weighs 167 grams. Since we won a pounds per minute value, multiply the weight of the six second shot by 10 to obtain a 60 second or one minute equivalent. In this example, we calculated a value of 1670 grams.

Next, divide that value by 454 to convert the grams per minute into pounds per minute. In this example, the throughput of our gun is 3.67 ppm. The ppm is acceptable if it falls within five percent of the target throughput configured at initial setup. If not, call FSI for technical support. Attach a new production nozzle and you are now ready to begin production. When dispensing is to cease for more than 30 seconds at a time, detach the mixed nozzle and replace it with a new one. Mixed nozzles cannot be reused. The spritzer gun whip was engineered as a disposable part and requires frequent replacement. When replacing the gun whip, start by shutting off the chemical valves on both the ISO and polyol cylinders.

Next, close the chemical ball valves at the end of the gun width. Then dispense the remaining chemical in the gun whip into a trash bag or receptacle. Disconnect the gun whip from the insulated hose assembly. We recommend doing this over a trash can or receptacle to catch a residual chemical that may frolf out as you loosen the connections. Discard the old gun whip. Wipe off any residual chemical from the insulated hose assembly to keep the equipment clean and in good working condition.

Attach the new gun whip and ensure the connections are tight. Repeat the process for the other gun whip. Then, open the chemical ball valves on both cylinders, and open the chemical ball valves at the gun whip. You will need to pull the trigger for about 10 seconds to purge the air from the new whips. Now, perform the ratio and throughput quality control procedures before continuing production. At the end of production, the spritzer dispensing unit must be properly shut down. Here’s a quick review of the procedures. First, engage the trigger safety on the gun and remove the mix tube, and wipe off the gun face. Now, close both the iso and polyol ball valves at the gun whip. Then clean the gun face of chemical and foam using DK 817. Lubricate the gun face and pack the handle with petroleum jelly, or lithium based grease.

Next, close the chemical and nitrogen ball valves on the cylinders. Finally, turn the nitrogen supply off. The spritzer gun is now properly and safely shut down. Laminated startup and shutdown procedures should be present in all designated mixing areas for reference. Please contact the FSI technical service department if you are in need of additional or replacement copies. Again if you have any questions at all about the spritzer startup, QC, or shutdown procedures, please call our technical service department at 1 800 325 4875. For international customers, dial + 1 314 344 3330. We’re always ready to help our valued customers in any way we can.

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SLUG Block Change-out Procedures

SLUG Block Change-out Procedures

Video Transcription

Welcome to another FSI instructional video on the proper procedure for changing out a slug block. These easy but
critical steps will ensure the proper and safe operation of your slug gun. Before beginning, make sure all ball valves at the gun head are in the off, or closed position. The mix tube and mix tube adapter need to be removed. Unpack, the new or reconditioned block. Fill out the block reconditioning request form and send it back with a block that needs repair. We also recommend replacing the rod with each block change out. To begin the procedure, remove the quarter inch clear air tube from the hose barb.

Next, remove the plastic plugs from the block face, to access the head bolts. Loosen the bolts to remove the air bracket assembly. Then unscrew the wing bolts to remove one of the wings. Wipe off the wing and place it into a rubber glove or plastic bag to catch any residual chemical that might run out. This will help keep residual chemical off other parts and assist in keeping your gun clean. Repeat the process for the other wing. Loosen and remove the head bolts so the block can be detached from the air cylinder.

Next, slide the safety valve forward to the on position and trigger the gun twice. The block should detach from the head assembly. If the block does not detach, place a wrench, dowel, or other tool between the block, and the grease collar, and trigger the gun twice again. If the block still doesn’t detach, first, try pulling it off with your hands. If unsuccessful, please call the FSI technical service department for assistance. If you are changing out a spring block, be sure to remove the five spring washers and brass bushing. After removing the block, remove the grease collar and clean off the old grease from the rod. Remove the old rod using two half-inch open end wrenches. Lubricate the threads of the new rod with petroleum jelly and attach the new rod.

Tighten the rod using two half-inch open end wrenches. Remove the tape from the new block and inspect it to ensure that all chemical orifices are free of debris and shards. Ensure the old grease and debris are removed from the grease collar. Then lubricate both the front and back sides of the grease collar. Lubricate the rear side of the new block and attach the grease collar. Make sure the grease fitting on the grease collar points upward when lining up. Then lubricate the head bolt threads, and insert them through the new bloc, and collar. Slide the safety valve back to the off position, and push the rod back so it is locked in the retracted position.

Push the new block onto the rod and thread the bolts so the block is aligned. If you are changing out a spring block, take special care to insert the brass bushing. First, into the slug block. Followed by the five spring washers exactly as illustrated on the spring block reconditioning request form. Tighten the head bolts to the air cylinder. Alternate between head bolts to tighten the block evenly using the same number of turns on one head bolt, and then the other. Push the safety forward to the on position and trigger the gun several times to ensure the rod extends and retracts properly. Now pull the safety to the back position to lock the rod in the back position.

Next, remount the chemical orifices with the appropriate drill bit. As shown in this chart, the correct drill bit size has also stamped in the lower left corner on the bottom of the block. Now, push the safety valve forward to the on position to force the rod forward. Then, pull the safety back to the off position to avoid an accidental trigger.

Next, grease the gun through the fitting until grease comes out of the hole on the bottom of the block. Now, lubricate the wings, block, and wing bolt threads. Then reconnect both wings, remove the hose barb from the old block, and replace it on the new block. Make sure the hose barb is clean and free of debris. Replace the hose barb if necessary. Reconnect the air bracket assembly, and tighten the bolts. Then, reconnect the clear air tube. Replace the air tube if it is not clean and free to allow sufficient airflow. Secure the air tube to the hose barb with a wire tie.

Now the block change out procedure is complete. Finally, remember to return the used block to FSI for reconditioning. Be sure the block reconditioning request form is complete. Please indicate your preferred method of return shipping for your new block. If none is selected, we will use the same shipping method you used when sending to us. If you have any questions at all about the slug block change-out procedure, please call the FSI technical service department at, 1-800-325-4875. International customers at, +1-314-344-3330. We are always ready to help our valued customers any way we can.

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SLUG Pro Mix Cartridge Replacement

SLUG Pro Mix Cartridge Replacement

Video Transcription

This is an instructional video on the proper procedures for replacing the disposable mix cartridge on the Slug Professional Series rigid polyurethane dispensing equipment. The following steps are easy, but important to ensure the proper operation of the slug pro.

Step one, disconnect the airline source, or close the airline ball valve.

Step two, close all four chemical ball valves.

Step three, disconnect the air purge line at the dispensing head.

Step four, remove the four bolts from the tee cap with a 3/16 inch hex key, and set the bolts aside for reassembly. Then remove the tee count.

Step five, remove the disposable mix cartridge assembly. Use a 1/8 inch hex key to turn the two extraction screws clockwise to eject the disposable mix cartridge. Once loosened, fully remove and dispose of the mix cartridge. Then retract the extraction screws to the beginning flush position. It is important to return the screws to the original position, at or below the U frame receiver, failure to do so could result in damage to the new mix cartridge. Remove the old grease and debris from the receiver. There is no need to use a spray cleaner, once the old grease is removed, apply fresh Vaseline or lithium grease to the walls of the U frame receiver.

Step six, inspect the three new o-rings to assure they’re not damaged. Then, seat them into the new cartridge while lubricating each one with vaseline, or lithium grease.

Step seven, insert the new cartridge into the receiver. Align the cartridge so that the small O-ring is on top and the guide hole for the corresponding receiver guide pin is on the bottom. Once the cartridge is properly aligned, press firmly into place. Make sure the cartridge is flush with the bottom of the receiver.

Step eight, reinstall the tee cap with the four bolts. Then reattach the airline.

Step nine, grease the Slug Pro through the grease port, pump in grease until it flows from the weep hole underneath the U frame receiver.

The Slug Pro is now ready for quality control. See our chemical system quality control procedures video for more information. If you have any questions, please contact the Foam Supplies technical service department by phone or email.

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SLUG Pro Start-up / Shut-down Procedures

SLUG Pro Start-up / Shut-down Procedures

Video Transcription

At Foam Supplies, safety is always our primary concern, especially personal safety. That’s why we created this quick instructional video on the proper and safe procedures for starting up and shutting down our Solvent-Less Urethane Gun or SLUG for short. After viewing the procedures, if there is anything you don’t understand, please contact our technical service department, before attempting any procedures. A representative will be happy to walk you through the process or schedule a visit for training. Before we begin, let’s take a quick look at the various letter and color designations of the ISO and polyol cylinders in different parts of the world. In this video, we’ll use the U.S. designations of A for ISO and B for polyol. Ok, let’s get started.

First, always remember to wear protective eyewear and gloves while operating the gun. Please refer to the MSDS for the proper and safe handling of materials, including the use of protective equipment, like safety glasses, protective gloves, and respirator protection where needed. With your protective gear in place, you’re ready to begin the slug startup procedures. The first step, is check the chemical cylinders. Start by checking the level gauge on both the ISO or A and polyol or B cylinders to ensure sufficient chemical supply. If the chemical level is close to 5%, we recommend changing chemical cylinders before going further. Draining tanks below 5% will lead to nitrogen in the chemical lines, which can cause problems with dispensing equipment, and could result in poor end product.

Now check the temperature gauge on the filter assembly. Keep in mind that 70 degrees Fahrenheit, or 21 degrees Celsius, is the minimum operating temperature. Please refer to the process setup acknowledgement for the specific operating parameters for your foaming process. Next, confirm there is a sufficient nitrogen supply. This is a good time to review the ways nitrogen is supplied, single bottles, six packs, twelve packs, micro bulk tanks, and bulk tanks. To check the supply, turn on the nitrogen cylinder.

Open the valve slowly, but ensure that it is fully open. Then check the following three parameters, first is the nitrogen reserve gauge. Sufficient nitrogen capacity is necessary for production. The minimum nitrogen requirement is 500 psi, so change nitrogen tanks when below 500 psi. Second, once sufficient nitrogen supply is confirmed, check for leaks. Leaks will lead to unnecessary waste of nitrogen and cause more frequent change outs. Third, check the regulator pressures. The setpoint is 240 to 245 psi. Do not exceed these pressure levels. Remember that the regulators are set during initial setup, and adjustments rarely if ever need to be made. The next step is to slowly open the nitrogen and chemical ball valves at both cylinders.

Now turn the timer and heat box on. Connect the air hose to the air supply, and turn the air supply on. Now you need to clean out the lubricant from the slug block. Then clean the slug block threads and the rod face with dk 8:17. Next, grease the slug cylinder. Frequently greasing the slug cylinder will assist in longevity of operation. Now attach the adapter, mix tube, and collar. Then open all four ball valves at the dispensing head, and push the slide safety valve forward to the on position.

At this point, it is important to remember that the equipment is ready to dispense chemical, and precautions should be taken to avoid an accidental discharge. The slug unit is almost ready for production and the startup is nearly complete. Before production, it is important to perform a series of quality control steps. These steps are described in greater detail in a separate Foam Supplies video. Once the documented QC procedures are finished, and the slug unit is mixing chemical properly, it is ready to dispense for production. Laminated startup procedures should be present in all designated mixing areas for reference. Please contact the FSI technical service department if you are in need of additional, or replacement copies. At the end of production, the slug unit must be properly shut down. Here’s a quick review of the procedures. First, close all four ball valves at the dispensing head. Then, pull the slide safety valve to the off or back position.

Now, check the mix tube for chemical buildup. If a 3/8 inch rod cannot slide easily into the mix tube, you must clean it or replace it with the air supply off. Remove the mix tube collar mix tube and adapter. Now, claim the slug block and rod face with dk 8:17. Wipe off any residue, and lubricate, and pack the slug block with petroleum jelly or a lithium based grease. Then grease the slug cylinder.

Next, turn the timer and heat box off. Close the chemical and nitrogen ball valves on the chemical cylinders, and finally turn the nitrogen supply off. The slug is now properly and safely shut down. Laminated shutdown procedures should also be present in all designated mixing areas for reference. Please contact the FSI technical service department if you are in need of additional or replacement copies. Again, if you have any questions at all about either the slugs start-up, or shut down procedures, please call our technical department at, 1-800 325 4875. International customers dial + 1 314 344 3330 we’re always ready to help our valued customers in any way we can.

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